Womens Health and Wellness Tips

Jul 14 2020 Published by under Uncategorized

Such factors can include her family, the relationships she has – her spiritual values and her work environment. Beyond this she is also affected by her position in the community. The reason why women’s health is different to men’s health is due to the fact that women react differently to disease.

The key to a woman improving her health lies in understanding the factors which affect her. The emphasis ought to be on preventative health and engaging in education on how best to have a healthy lifestyle.

In the past, life was very difficult for women. The ability to talk openly about various issues was difficult especially relative to reproduction. Society in those days was less open and there was an underlying fear of how a woman was viewed. Many women became mothers and wives at a very young age. There were many pregnancies some of which were wanted and others which were not.

Back then childbirth itself was challenging and many women died while giving birth.

Today things have changed dramatically; this of course depends on where you live in the world. These days’ women’s health issues are far more open and are readily discussed.

There is a lot of information out there which can provide for an enriching learning experience where each individual can benefit from a greater understanding of the issues involved.

There is so much information available on the subject of women’s health that shelves of bookstore space are now devoted to the subject. Women today can be proud of the fact that information, dialogue and discussion of reproductive disorders are freely available.

In the western world access to this information and the freedom to choose is of the utmost importance however even though all this information is available there are some topics which still remain in the shadows and without this information certain options remain limited.

Dietary information is very important to a woman’s well being. Women have specific nourishing requirements relative to their biochemistry. Optimal health will be directly affected by the nutrients provided by fats and proteins. For example fat-soluble vitamins are vital when it comes to nourishing the endocrine system and the reproductive organs.

We all know that there is lots of information out there but it is the danger of inaccurate information which can capture a woman in a vicious cycle of ineffective treatment and disease. As a consequence it is important to identify the source and look for reference material which supports any claims made.

Comments are off for this post

The Surprising Big Threat To Women’s Health

Jul 14 2020 Published by under Uncategorized

I have to admit, sometimes I’m a little worried when I see all the publicity and awareness about breast cancer. Certainly I consider breast cancer a significant threat. As an integrative doctor, specializing in women’s health, I’ve seen enough patients battling this disease to know this first-hand.

But as bad as it is, breast cancer is not the biggest killer of women. Heart disease kills more women than any other disease. In fact it kills more women than all cancers combined. And it kills more older women than it kills older men.

Unfortunately, not enough women take this threat seriously enough. While it’s slowly gaining more recognition, it’s not on our radars… and it’s not on enough physicians’ radars as well.

As one of my colleagues, a thoracic surgeon with a great sense of humor, said in a speech I recently attended, “I wish doctors would stop giving women the bikini treatment, focusing only on breasts and reproductive organs.”

Indeed, there’s a lot more of you in between that needs care. Chief among these parts of your body is your heart.

How To Give Your Heart Some Good, Healthy Love

Now, certainly some women have the odds already stacked against them if they have a family history of heart disease.

But for most of us, protecting your heart is a matter of lifestyle changes.

  • Eat lots of veggies and fruits to get lots of fiber and antioxidants.
  • Move your body – sweat!
  • Take care of your emotional health. Minimize stress and maximize your relationships.

You’ve probably heard this advice but I’ll repeat it. Because here’s the thing that you may not hear from your doctor…

No medical intervention – surgery or drugs or special medical devices – none of these can fix a broken heart.

Sure, we can patch things together a bit to help your heart limp along. But it’s not the same as having a healthy heart.

And here’s another story you may not hear very much about. Many of these interventions may even make things worse.

Several studies have shown certain statin drugs offer no benefit to women at risk for heart disease. And there is some evidence that it may even increase women’s risk for heart attacks and death.[1]

In 2012, the Archives of Internal Medicine published a study showing that statins increased the risk for diabetes in post-menopausal women by 71%.[2]

I’m not saying this because I don’t value the technology western medicine offers. I’ve seen firsthand how conventional medicine can save lives.

But the best cure is prevention. And the best doctor is you.

Easy Steps To Moving More

Now you may be gritting your teeth as you read this, thinking that it will be too hard to change how you eat and fit fitness in.

And I won’t lie and tell you it won’t take some will power and intention. It will.

But there are two points of comfort I want to offer you right now…

  1. Even just small changes can make a tremendous difference when it comes to heart health. As New York Times health journalist, Gretchen Reynolds wrote in her groundbreaking book, The First 20 Minutes, the biggest health gains are made in simply moving 20 minutes a day more if you’ve been sedentary.

So while moving more than 20 minutes is even better (although too much exercising, like running marathons, can also be bad for your heart), don’t put activity off because you can’t get yourself to exercise for an hour. Just do 20 minutes and you’ve already changed your fate.

  1. You don’t have to make these changes or get the exercise in all at once. Use small bites.

When it comes to exercise, do 10 minutes in the morning and another 10 minutes in the afternoon.

Sneaky Ways To Shift Your Diet

When it comes to improving nutrition, you don’t have to start eating only tofu and broccoli cold turkey. Make shifts like snacking on fruit, rather than chips. Start changing out your white flour pasta and bread for whole grains.

Add a salad to every meal and an extra serving of veggies and eat those before you dig into everything else.

One of my favorite ways to get more heart-healthy vegetables in is to take chlorella either as a tablet or as granules you can mix right into your food. Chlorella not only gives you powerful heart-healthy antioxidants like chlorophyll and beta carotene, but it also gives you vitamins essential for heart health like vitamin D and B12.

And it gives your heart the essential mineral, magnesium.

Finally, research indicates chlorella may help make a difference in maintaining healthy cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure levels as well as blood pressure levels.[3,4,5]

Women, You Are Your Best Heart Doctor

Heart disease is a very real threat. Medicine can’t cure it. Surgery can’t fix it.

You’re the best doctor when it comes to your heart. Only the changes you make in your life can truly keep your heart healthy for the long term.

But don’t sweat it – it doesn’t have to be a monumental task.

If you take it step by step, you’ll make big changes you never thought you could make!

So take the first step right now. Make a commitment to yourself and your future. Take a small action today and do it again tomorrow and the next day and the next, adding on as you go. By doing so, you’ll be walking towards this heart-healthy future you’ve promised to yourself.

Sources:

[1] Vos E. Statins for women, elderly: Malpractice? Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases (2007) 17, e19ee20

[2] Culver AL et al. Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus in postmenopausal women in the Women’s Health Initiative. Arch Intern Med. 2012 Jan 23;172(2):144-52. Epub 2012 Jan 9.

[3] Hashimoto S et al. Effects of soybean phospholipid, chlorella pyrenoidosa and clofibrate on collagen and elastin synthesis in the aorta and on the serum and liver lipid contents in rats, Experimental and Molecular Pathology, 1982; 36: pp. 99-106.

[4] Merchant RE. Dietary supplementation with chlorella pyrenoidosa produces positive results in patients with cancer or suffering from certain common chronic illnesses, Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients, 2001; 211-212: pp. 74-80.

[5] Mizoguchi, T. Nutrigenomic Studies of Effects of Chlorella on Subjects with High-Risk Factors for Lifestyle-Related Disease. J Med Food 11 (3) 2008, 395-404.

Comments are off for this post

Womens Health – Pregnancy Nutrition is for All Women of Child Bearing Age

Jul 13 2020 Published by under Uncategorized

During pregnancy your nutrition needs are going to increase. Even before becoming pregnant it is a good idea to make every effort to start eating healthy and taking a women’s multivitamin. A prenatal multivitamin is a better choice during pregnancy.

Let’s start with the recommended daily intake of food during pregnancy.

DURING PREGNANCY :

7 or more Fruits and Vegetables (3 fruits/4 vegetables)

Fruits and Vegetables high in vitamin C are the best. These include strawberries, melons, oranges, papaya, tomatoes, peppers, greens, and broccoli.

9 or more Whole Grain Products

A fortified breakfast cereal containing iron and folic acid is the best way to start each day. Enriched bread, rice, pasta, and any whole grain product are your other choices.

4 or more dairy products

Low-fat milk or non-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese are the obvious choices.

60 grams of protein (two or more 2-3 ounce portions of lean meat)

Other sources of protein include eggs, nuts, dried beans, and peas. Do not eat undercooked or uncooked meat or fish. (NO SUSHI) Do not eat deli luncheon meats

PREGNANCY NUTRITION FACTS

Fish

Some fish are higher in mercury content than others. Mercury can cause problems with your growing baby’s brain and nervous system.

Fish to avoid completely:

shark
swordfish
king mackerel
golden snapper
white snapper

Fish eating limitations:
Limit your intake of fish to 12 ounces a week
Limit your intake of white tuna or tuna steak to 6 ounces a week

Safest fish to eat:
shrimp
salmon
catfish

light tuna

Weight

Calorie intake should only be increased by 300 a day during pregnancy for the average woman.
Weight gain should be around 28-40 pounds for women that are underweight at pregnancy.
Women that are overweight at pregnancy should gain only 15-25 pounds.
Weight gain should be around 2-4 pounds the first trimester and 3-4 pounds a month for the remaining time.
Excess weight gain is hard to lose after pregnancy because your body’s fat increases up to one third during pregnancy.
Breast feeding burns 500 or more calories per day making it easier to lose weight.
Consult your health care provider for your specific healthy weight gain.

Vitamins and Minerals

Check the RDA chart for your needs during pregnancy.

Folic Acid is a special concern because a deficiency can lead to neural tube birth defects. Your multivitamin should contain 400 mcg of folic acid. Birth defects happen before you even know you’re pregnant so always take a multivitamin with folic acid during child bearing age.

Vitamin C taken in doses over 500 mg/d can lead to your baby being born dependent on large quantities of vitamin C.

Iron is also of special concern because the average American diet does not provide enough iron during pregnancy. If your prenatal multivitamin does not contain enough iron your doctor will prescribe an additional supplement. Iron is needed for you and the baby to have healthy teeth, bones, and blood.

Water is often overlooked during pregnancy but it is vital for you and your baby. It carries the nutrients from your body to the baby and it helps prevent constipation, hemorrhoids, swelling and urinary tract infection. A minimum of 6 eight ounce glasses a day is required. Juice can count toward your 6 glasses but be careful of the added calories. Any drink containing caffeine actually reduces the fluid in your body and cannot count towards your 6 glasses.

Calcium is needed by you and the baby for strong teeth and bones. During pregnancy you need 1,000 mg/d and 1,300 mg/d if you are less than 18 years old.

Alcohol Consumption

There is no safe time or amount of alcohol to consume during pregnancy. No alcohol is the only way to insure the health of your baby. Alcohol you drink goes to your baby through the umbilical cord. Alcohol affects the baby’s growth, the baby’s brain, and can cause birth defects. These effects will remain with your unborn child for his/her entire life. FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders) is the name given to anyone affected by their mother’s alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Problems learning, memory retention, and hearing are just a few things that alcohol can do to your child.

Caffeine

Caffeine in large quantities can lead to low weight babies. It also reduces the amount of vital water in your body. Although not yet proven, some studies suggest that it may harm the fetus. While not as dangerous as alcohol it should still be avoided.

Diabetics

Diabetics can have perfectly normal babies like every other woman. There are a just a few things you need to be careful of.
1. Keep your blood sugar under control for a minimum of 3 months before becoming pregnant.
2. Make sure you get enough folic acid at all times during your child bearing years (400 mcg/d).
3. Don’t let your blood sugar get too high during pregnancy. This can lead to birth defects or your baby having blood sugar level problems

Ways To Control Morning Sickness

*Eat 6 small meals instead of 3 large ones

*Don’t go without eating for long periods of time

*Don’t drink fluids with your meals

*Don’t eat greasy, spicy, or fried foods

*Avoid unpleasant smells

*Don’t get over tired

Comments are off for this post

Women’s Issues: Mood Swings, PMS and Emotional Health – Take Help From The Gynecologist

Jul 13 2020 Published by under Uncategorized

There’s a TIME of the month when a woman is at the peak of irritability – her body starts bloating, the face gets covered in acne, and she might as well feel pain in the lower abdomen portion. But, what irritates her most is ‘Nothing- but still everything’ around her. In short, you know a woman is PMS-ing when she has sudden shift of moods – from happy to sad to angry and to crazy.

This article will summarize the major woman’s issue- Premenstrual Syndrome

Premenstrual Syndrome or PMS is the combination of several symptoms that several women suffer from a week before their period. The symptoms usually go away when the woman starts bleeding (menstruation), gets pregnant or gets her menopause. Researchers have found out that PMS is caused by acute inflammation triggered by a biomarker called C-reactive protein (CRP). Changes in the hormonal balance before and during the menstrual cycle seem to be another major cause for the problem. Chemical changes in the brain may also be involved to some extent which is why there are high chances of a woman feeling stressed, emotional or majorly depressed.

According to the study published in the Journal of Women’s Health, it was surveyed 3,302 women and found the presence of CRP appears to be linked to PMS symptoms. Previous research on CRP in relation to heart attacks has found CRP presence is linked to inflammation.

While body ache and mood swings may not look like a threat and seem pretty normal during that time, there’s no reason why we should ignore it. If you have been experiencing beyond the run-of-the-mill mood swings you might be suffering from PMDD.

Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) is a condition in which a woman has severe depression symptoms, irritability, and tension before menstruation. These symptoms of PMDD are more severe than those seen in Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) and can be highly disabling if ignored.

Though it has not been determined whether all women suffer from the risk of PMDD or there are only a few of them, but whatever be the case it is extremely important to know the causes, symptoms and treatment of the problem. Consult a gynecologist so you can know the underlying cause of the problem and the necessary treatment. Make sure you do not ignore the mood swings that happen before your menstrual cycle thinking it to be normal – there could be a bigger problem waiting ahead.

Dear Women,

Never should you neglect your health and the changes in your body, even if it is smallest fraction of the problem. Something as normal as mood swings might turn up as a problem if left unattended; so make sure you see a doctor before things worsen.

With Love,

Another Woman

Comments are off for this post